Formula D: Racing Dice Game

 Game: Formula D  Age: 8+
 Publisher: Asmodee  Players: 2- 10
 Time: 45- 60 minutes  Replayability: 7/ 10

formula dFormula D: Racing Dice Game

Formula D is one of the greatest racing games I’ve ever had a chance to play (I haven’t played many) because of how involved the experience can get. I know, what do you mean involved with a very slow pacing racing game with plastic cars and initial D functioning? With the right music (unless you don’t play music), the right group of friends, and with the right setting, the race can take you on a ride you’ll never expect from a board game like this. We were rolling dice, interacting with player moves, and laughing at the near misses and collisions that were so out of the ordinary. The concept isn’t anything new but the way it plays replicates a Japanese arcade racing game.  Its rule book is structured for beginners and advanced players to make sure the entirety of the game isn’t overwhelming. The box is enormous so I made sure to break it down into one of the bitbox boxes.

My Experience

I have played this multiple times over the course of a few years but last night was the influence to write this review. There were six of us getting our gears in place and our engines running. After we all picked our uniquely built players we set up for the race. We all started in first gear and rolled our 1st gear die which moves the car 1 or 2 spaces. Once we moved into second gear we began pushing 2- 4 spaces. About six-ish squares ahead of the race start there was the first turn of the race, each turn enforces you stop during the turn at least once. If not, you may suffer brake damage or tire damage. I made my first turn flawlessly, pushing myself into third gear. I do feel there is a slight disadvantage to players farther behind in the race, but their comeback was priceless.

Fast forward during one of the less linear turns, I saw as the two players in dead last rolled a 15 in their 5th gear, and catching up by near collisions to the rest of the players (of course we all rolled for collision damage). It was such a sight to see, watching that comeback and realizing this game can take a turn an 180* at any moment. In the end, I won by absolute luck of the roll, one of our players destroyed in wheels on the track, and the other weren’t too far behind me.

Final Thoughts

This is a game that can support about ten players and is interactive through collisions and by making zigzags around players. It’s learning curve is based on which rulebook you’d like to tackle, beginner book helps guide you through the game while the advance book breaks down specifics of the race. It’s replayable through fun, different maps, and expansion maps available. It takes a bit of time to setup with all the components and the pacing is slower than most.

You will like this game if you want a racing game that does a great job translating the theme into a board game.

You will not like this game if you want a shorter game to play with less components and rules to learn.

It is colorblind friendly

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Joseph Nicholas

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Indietabletop. Communication major. Favorite mechanics include: Bluffing and Deduction, modular boards, and action point allowance. Favorite video game genres are Rpgs, Puzzles games, and Sim/Tycoons.

You may also like...